hold


hold
hold vb
1 hold back, withhold, reserve, detain, retain, *keep, keep back, keep out
Analogous words: *restrain, inhibit, curb, check: preserve, conserve, *save
Contrasted words: *relinquish, surrender, abandon, resign, yield
2 *contain, accommodate
Analogous words: *carry, bear, convey: *receive, admit, take: house, lodge, *harbor, shelter: *include, comprehend
3 *have, own, possess, enjoy
Analogous words: control, direct, manage, *conduct
hold n Hold, grip, grasp, clutch are comparable when they denote the power of getting or of keeping something in possession or under control.
Hold is the most comprehensive of these terms, for it may apply to material, immaterial, or intangible matters and may imply mere possession or control or possession and control securely maintained
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lay hold on the deserters

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lost his hold on the side of the boat

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keep his hold on the property in dispute

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kept a hold on himself

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afraid they may lose their hold on the domestic market— Sydney Bulletin

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the hold of the public school upon the middle-class mind has not weakened— Lewis & Maude

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Grip primarily implies the power of taking hold of by the hand, but in its secondary senses it definitely suggests a firm and tenacious hold (as on a country by an oppressor, on a person's system by a disease, or on a body of facts or principles by an eager mind)
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he clutched Father Joseph's hand with a grip surprisingly strong— Cather

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the country was on the verge of bankruptcy and in the grip of a series of... insurrections— London Calling

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his interest . . . has been to strengthen the voters' grip on governmental machinery. A. D. H. Smith

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moreover habits acquired very early feel, in later life, just like instincts; they have the same profound gripRussell

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Grasp implies the power to reach out and get possession or control of something; in its basic applications it may be distinguished with difficulty from grip
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did not expect to feel his hand snatched away from her grasp as if from a burn— Conrad

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but in its now more common extended applications especially to what can be possessed by the mind it frequently distinctively connotes remarkable powers of comprehension on the one hand or outstanding range of mastery on the other
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ah, but a man's reach should exceed his grasp, or what's a heaven for?— Browning

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his grasp of the singular entirety of medieval civilization— Cram

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what competent person supposes that he understands a grain of sand? That is as much beyond our grasp as man— Justice Holmes

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Gray and Collins were masters, but they had lost that hold on human values, that firm grasp of human experience, which is a formidable achievement of the Elizabethan and Jacobean poets— T. S. Eliot

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Clutch basically implies a seizing and holding with the avidity or rapacity of or as if of a bird of prey
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a rabbit in the clutch of an owl

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In its extended use it stresses, far more than any of the preceding nouns, the notion of control as distinguished from possession
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fell into a usurer's clutches

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in the clutch of a great fear

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in the fell clutch of circumstance I have not winced nor cried aloud— Henley

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or that of the act or fact of grasping with violence, with effort, or with frantic determination (as under the impulsion of terror)
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in the clutches of a desperate infatuation— Schwartz

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the clutch of a drowning man at a straw

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I can't hold on ten seconds more . . . my clutch is going now— Marryat

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in the dry, womanless clutch of the army— Irwin Shaw

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Analogous words: possession, ownership (see corresponding verbs at HAVE): control, command, *power, authority

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Hold — Hold, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Held}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Holding}. {Holden}, p. p., is obs. in elegant writing, though still used in legal language.] [OE. haldan, D. houden, OHG. hoten, Icel. halda, Dan. holde, Sw. h[*a]lla, Goth. haldan to feed, tend… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • hold — hold1 [hōld] vt. held, holding [ME holden < Anglian OE haldan (WS healdan), akin to Ger halten, Goth haldan, to tend sheep < IE base * kel , to drive, incite to action > Gr kelēs, swift horse, L celer, swift: prob. sense development:… …   English World dictionary

  • Hold On — may refer to:ongs* Hold On (Tim Armstrong song) * Hold On (En Vogue song) * Hold On (Good Charlotte song) * Hold On (Jonas Brothers song) * Hold On (Korn song) * Hold On (John Lennon song) * Hold On (Magnet song) * Hold On (Razorlight song) *… …   Wikipedia

  • hold — Ⅰ. hold [1] ► VERB (past and past part. held) 1) grasp, carry, or support. 2) keep or detain. 3) have in one s possession. 4) contain or be capable of containing. 5) have or occupy (a job or position) …   English terms dictionary

  • Hold — Hold, v. i. In general, to keep one s self in a given position or condition; to remain fixed. Hence: [1913 Webster] 1. Not to move; to halt; to stop; mostly in the imperative. [1913 Webster] And damned be him that first cries, Hold, enough! Shak …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Hold on — Hold Hold, v. i. In general, to keep one s self in a given position or condition; to remain fixed. Hence: [1913 Webster] 1. Not to move; to halt; to stop; mostly in the imperative. [1913 Webster] And damned be him that first cries, Hold, enough!… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Hold up — Hold Hold, v. i. In general, to keep one s self in a given position or condition; to remain fixed. Hence: [1913 Webster] 1. Not to move; to halt; to stop; mostly in the imperative. [1913 Webster] And damned be him that first cries, Hold, enough!… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • hold-up — [ ɔldɶp ] n. m. inv. • 1925; mot angl. amér., de to hold up one s hands « tenir les mains en l air » ♦ Anglic. Vol à main armée dans un lieu public. ⇒Fam. braquage. Hold up d une banque. Commettre un hold up. hold up n. m. inv. (Anglicisme)… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Hold — (h[=o]ld), n. 1. The act of holding, as in or with the hands or arms; the manner of holding, whether firm or loose; seizure; grasp; clasp; grip; possession; often used with the verbs take and lay. [1913 Webster] Ne have I not twelve pence within… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Hold Me — Hold Me, Thrill Me, Kiss Me, Kill Me Saltar a navegación, búsqueda «Hold Me, Thrill Me, Kiss Me, Kill Me» Sencillo de U2 del álbum Batman Forever Soundtrack Publicación 5 y 6 de junio 1995 …   Wikipedia Español


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